Footwork Techniques - Part 1

Think of sports where footwork determines the outcome of whether you score: cricket, golf and tennis are three that if you don't have good footwork you are given out, don't hit the ball or in the wrong part of the court, unable to return the ball. In combative sports like boxing, karate, taekwondo and kung fu footwork means the difference between hitting and being hit (not a good outcome if you are trying to score points in a championship).

Bridging, attacking, defending and trapping are four types of footwork, which assist you in having a successful outcome and all are self-explanatory; bridging and attacking will be in this instalment, defending and trapping discussed in the next installment.

Bridging is 'acceleration across the gap' either priming or blocking opponent's vision as you cross that gap, you require explosive action to catch your opponent flat footed. There are many methods to improve this such as modified Plyometrics, agility ladder training which improve mobility, skipping and sprints between floor cones again develops those muscles that are required for explosive actions.

Attacking footwork again is acceleration, correct distance, good timing and using the correct technique once in scoring range. Your opponents may try and anticipate your attack, put space between you and them decreasing your effectiveness, so you must be disguise or increase your speed when attacking to be successful.

Bridging Footwork

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1. Opposite Stances
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2. Switch Stance, bridging gap
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3. White Scores

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1. Opposite Stances
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2. Low disturb to bridge
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3. Scoring, reverse roundhouse

Attacking Footwork

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1. Same stance
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2. White blocks vision
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3. Attacks middle roundhouse

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1. Same stance
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2. Switches stance
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3. Sweeps scores reverse punch

You may argue that bridging and attacking footwork are very similar; bridging is for those fighters who do not have natural acceleration and have to use primary technique to obscure their main scoring technique. Attacking is sheer acceleration either from a static position or bouncing action.

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